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fun of some religions and not others, and taxpayer dollars are paying for this shot at christianity. plus, the parents of the defendants-- the parents of the victim, and the prosecutor in charge of the case sharing powerful, powerful statements in sub steubenville, ohio as the judge finds the two teens guilty of rape. and a look the at the verdict and ask whether the punishment fits the crime. >> and the-- that needs to be taken-- (inaudible) an absolute disregard for another human being cannot go without punishment. hi. i'm henry winkler. and i'm here to tell homeowners that are 62 and older about a great way to live a better retirement. it's called a reverse mortgage. [ male announcer ] call right now to receive your free dvd and booklet with no obligation. it answers questions like how a reverse mortgage works, how much you qualify for, the ways to receive your money, and more. plus, when you call now, you'll get this magnifier with l.e.d. light absolutely free. when you call the experts at one reverse mortgage today, you'll learn the benefits of a government-insured reverse mort
religion correspondent lauren green is here next. it's a pig fight, a family forced out of their home over their pet. the controversy behind this coming up. ♪ [ male announcer ] in blind taste tests, even ragu users chose prego. prego?! but i've bought ragu for years. [ thinking ] wonder what other questionable choices i've made? i choose date number 2! whooo! [ sigh of relief ] [ male announcer ] choose taste. choose prego. [ sigh of relief ] all right that's a fifth-floor probleok.. not in my house! ha ha ha! ha ha ha! no no no! not today! ha ha ha! ha ha ha! jimmy how happy are folks who save hundreds of dollars switching to geico? happier than dikembe mutumbo blocking a shot. get happy. get geico. fifteen minutes could save you fifteen percent or more. >> welcome back. time for your shot of the morni morning. [cat meowing] >> cats and dogs calling a truce. and the cat is herding the puppies. >> in a reversal of the natural order, it's a cat herding puppies. >> clayton: amazing, one wary dog, i don't know about this, is he leading me into a trap. this video of course -- this video h
of the jews and religion which was important for the rest of the world. >> sean: is that really so good? >> so for him to say that, it was a good things. and now, he wants the palestinians to recognize the jewish state. this is not going to happen. >> sean: i wanted to get your reaction? >> i spent a good amount of time in israel just over a month ago talking with their ministers and talking with the people. they are guarded. that is the only way i can say. they are guarded about american leadership and they understand our culture. we talk about the red line and who gives netanyahu the go ahead and does it meet the reality. net netted is going to have make the decisions he needs to make and he so get past that. get past the obama statements. get past the fact that we know that in 67 hamas was formed by the muslim brotherhood. he wants us to go back to '67 borders but it's not going to happen. >> the hamas charter still calls for the destruction -- >> look at the culture and look at the fact that they keep their people down so they can use them as ploys, if you will, to the world. the final thi
. there are wonderful activities going on by all of the world's major religions right now including the evangelical churches to say this is a moral and religious issue, okay. from our worldview, from our standpoint, this is crucial both because we were commanded by god in genesis to till and tend the garden, to care for his creation which when he created he kept telling us, "it is good." okay, it is our responsibility they would say to take care of his creation, and that the kinds of things that we are currently doing to the planet are essentially violating that promise. but moreover, we're also seeing the theme of social justice, that we've been commanded, they would say, to take care of the least of these -- the poor, the sick, the powerless both in our own country and around the world. and many churches, in fact, have invested enormous resources, i mean, sending their young people abroad to do great works to try to help people who desperately need that help. their argument would be how can we in good conscience ignore a problem that's just going to push millions of more people around the world i
've been in rome watching the new pope be selected. so i've been there getting religion and i've sort of lost sight what's going on in washington. give me an update of what i have missed. >> there's no white smoke coming out of the rnc building yet charlie i will tell you that. >> rose: what about the whitehouse. >> or the whitehouse. there's a great deal of ferment going on in the republican party right now which i think by and rge is healthy. there's a cole caveats now but the previous report on immigration i think a lot of things are happening. rand paul today came out for at least legal status for immigrants. so i think some people thought after this last election debalk backal will be pointing fingers and there's a lot of that going on. some of this stuff i think is productive for them now. putting a paper together the way actually doing some of this stuff. for instance it says we can't be a party of universal purity. yes we can all agree on that. it may be harder when they get to the caucuses. >> rose: are you watching or seeing each of the possible canned dates in 2016 stakin
, she spends a lot of time reminiscing and reflecting on the role of religion and it's very much an important piece for her. >> next up is nick in prince frederick, maryland, hi, nick. >> first of all, thank you for this great program. i'm glad you are part of it. we have links to louisa catherine here. her uncle was one of maryland's first governors. the most we have is what of our town centers, we have a plaque. and a book where you get an impression of louisa catherine that she is very involved in the politics of washington. you don't get the sense of whether it is just a surface or whether her words are contributing to the compromises that are made during that time. would you mind commenting on those two things? >> that is louisa catherine's birth family. in maryland? do you know of them? >> her family was from maryland. her father was born in maryland. that is very important because that is how she makes her claim that she is an american. i met the war in london, but my father is an american. her uncle was the first governor of maryland. so, she has an important connection w
of freedom and religion and call on the iranian authorities to respect mr. abedini's human rights and to release him. you know, that is his statement. is that, what more do you want? what more do you expect? >> he made that statement the day he was confirmed but he wasn't secretary of state. since he has been secretary of state senator rubio's office has been following up with secretary kerry's office. he was responding to a question from senator rubio, a written question. here is another one of our points. the state department has never taken a proactive step. everything has been a reaction to a reporter's question, a senator's question. let's issue a statement from the secretary of state. martha: you played down this deadline here today of friday. what do you want by friday. >> we hope it comes before so we can work with the state department a clear statement from john kerry, secretary of state calling for eye saeed abedini's release and calling for iran to release this american citizen today. martha: i will leave everyone with this thought. you remember the hikers and all of th
have to learn how to understand , accept, and appreciate different cultures of religions and beliefs and value diversity. monty on twitter. dirty water on twitter, jim writes in, the hate of ours in the black community is a train that has left the station years ago. in our facebook page, leonard writes in that republicans are not good at self-evaluations. they think they're perfect and that the voters are dumb. they call us low information. until they change that, they will continue to lose. we're taking republican calls this morning on the subject. danny is up next from ohio. danny, thanks for calling in. caller: hello. host: go ahead. caller: yeah, i just think the national republican party needs to quit cramming down -- their candidates down to the reagan democrats, which i started as a reagan democrat. i think that's where the party's going. i work in a union shop, and that's what you hear from ranking democrats is the party keeps cramming down these candidates like mitt romney and people just will not vote for them. host: danny from ohio this morning. one more quick of reince pr
witnessed the homily from pope francis. during this mass, the holy communion. our religion correspondent lauren green in rome for us this morning. lauren, people of the faith are very well familiar with this process. >> absolutely. i want to clarify something, that pope francis is not offering communion to the masses but only to the deacons there. estimates say that about 150,000 people in st. peter's square, that column-lined street leading to the vatican. there are priests going to the crowd that will venture communion to the people, to anybody who wants it. nobody will be turned away. those yellow and white umbrellas, those are indications to the people in the crowd that communion is being served and they should head to one of those umbrellas if they want to be served. we're not quite sure how long the communion will last. but everybody will be served. and everybody who wants to partake of the meal can. >> father murray, father gerald murray from holy family church in new york with us this morning as well. the body of christ, the bread of heaven and catholics believe that there's a tr
in their religion or in their experience, it is an extremely difficult thing to do. jon: marvin, i understand you can hear me now. >> i'm back. jon: good. >> i just answered his question. >> thank you very much. [laughter] jon: i have one for you, marvin, you you were saying the press should have been more skeptical. you had the director of the cia saying weapons of mass destruction a slam dunk in iraq, you had saddam apparently telling his own generals that he had weapons of mass destruction. you had colin powell going before the u.n. general assembly and saying, look, they've got all the parts and pieces they need to build weapons of mass destruction. how much more skeptical was the press supposed to be? >> well, you are setting up the bush administration's case for war in iraq. and the united states went to war in iraq. congress supported the president's policy on going to war, and the media supported it what this all adds up to, however, since it didn't work out that way, was that somebody got it drastically wrong. american intelligence got it wrong, the brits got it wrong, the israelis got i
come to you to talk about religion at all? guest: we would treat them -- that's another thing. -- re portrayed as just about oil and about greed, i take great exception to that. i believe it does a disservice to those men and women who went and volunteered to go, especially in our medical facilities. at one time, we were treating one of our wounded service members and the person who wounded him. and our folks gave the treatment that they were supposed to give. if anybody else in the world wants to throw stones at us in america, they can go right ahead, but i will point to those kinds of examples to show why we are the freest, greatest country in the world. when we go in -- we left. we did not take a part of iraq. we did not say this is going to be our little piece of ground did we did what we needed to do, and now we are gone -- of ground. andid what we needed to do now we are gone. we are out. iraq is a sovereign country. america, that is who we are. i think that needs to be communicated. host: clint in texas. a democratic caller. go ahead. caller: i just wanted to make a comment. i
to university of kentucky fans is a religion. they expect to be in the tournament every single year. >> bill: and i would argue that they should be in this year because they won last year. >> okay. all right. because they won last year. okay. fine. never mind the fact that they went out in the first round of the nit. >> bill: who were -- >> some guy named robert morris. >> bill: okay. chester is not happy and he claims that on -- >> and i think it's a disgrace and a joke that the ncaa didn't put us in the tournament if you ask me it's a bunch of liberal socialism -- [ laughter ] >> and your party's partially responsible for it. >> your party? he's blaming me? >> bill: liberal socialism, man. blame it on bernie sanders. >> yeah, right. >> bill: all right. hey great lineup for you today, as always reporters from "the daily beast" and "politico," is going to be here in studio to talk about the president's trip to the middle east and speak with judy chu from southern california, but first -- >> announcer: this is the "full court press" press. >> overhead lions making news. i
of its suffering, but also all of its salvation. it's a part of the three great religions, jud judiasm, christianity that trace their roots to abraham and has inspired communities across the globe, including me and my fellow americans. in the united states a nation made up of people who crossed oceans to start anew were actually drawn to the idea of finding freedom in our land. the african-americans, the story of the exodus was perhaps the central story, the most powerful image about emerging from the grip of bondage to reach for liberty and human dignity, a tale that was carried from savory through the civil rights movement into today. for generations this promise helped people weather poverty and persecution while holding onto the hope that a better day was on the horizon. for me personally growing up in far-flung parts of the world and without firm roots the store row spoke to a yearning for every human being for a home. even as we draw strength from god's will and the freedom expressed on pass over we also know that here on earth we must bear our responsibilities in an imperfect wo
and religion." we grant them power. we protect them. they do not make us free. as long as we have the second amendment, we always will be. ourre america and politicians are only as powerful as we the people will allow. the latest from the nra, again focusing on guns, background checks. a look at guns and video games in our country. of course, front and center, following what happened in newtown, conn. last december. the hearst newspaper focusing on all of these issues, this writing -- chronicle," exploring one aspect of our culture, the prevalence of violence in our media. read some of the opinions available online. a lot of people weighing in on all of this. brian joins us from sterling heights, michigan. morning. caller: how are you? host: fine, thank you. caller: excellent. video games, as long as a , let thes a scapegoat parents raise the kids. back in the 1980's and 1990's anytime someone killed someone they blamed metal music. it is the same thing here. someone was out, they start shooting at people -- people play video games. he played video games. that is what it is. no. it starts at
to their religion or ethnicity, are starting to push back in some instances. there is a great deal of concern. i want to assure you, i mentioned i have met people the pre syrian army, and we have highlighted the worries of minority groups and christians, not that we are against the sunni majority of syria. we are not. the minorities are nervous and there might -- their rights must be protected and respected. we hear good things from them. i can tell you for example that they have met christian leaders from some of the communities in syria and have told us afterwards that their meetings were populated. we have to keep pushing in that direction. >> thank you. if you could touch on the chemical weapons issues. was called a red line and there have been reports as recently in the last 24 hours about what is actually happening on the ground, whether they have been used, whether they will be used. if you could just talk about what the administration is doing to prevent the transfer of these weapons to groups. thank you. >> we viewed this issue with extreme seriousness. it is incredibly important to us.
. it's a cross section of race, religion, color, age, you know, from a 20-year-old to a 70-year-old. and everybody needs that truck. and it's such a -- you know, it's a metaphor for the american dream and survival of the fittest. it starts out absurd because you're like what's the sport, you go like this. but, you know, 16 hours into it, you just desperately want everyone to win that truck. >> so i was asking how you came up with this idea. you're like straight out of broadway. you're not straight out of broadway. how did this happen? how did you guys come together? >> we met through a mutual friend and started writing songs, just songs. >> oh, really? >> we actually live three blocks away from each other. >> oh, okay. that will do it. >> and we were having a great time writing songs and amanda asked me to join the team, the hardbody team and so off we went. >> what's it been like? >> it's been thrilling. >> i mean the difference especially from being in a band to now doing this? >> very different. well, it's been a roller coaster ride. it's a gigantic team of people working tog
that the separation of religion from the state is the salvation of the country, that is the natural ally of the united states, not the islamic side. i think there should be more support for the politics of secularism in iraq. it would not be wrong. in fact, i would say and be necessary and highly desirable for the americans to support their natural allies, which i happen to believe represent the future of iraq and i myself am part of, at a personal level. so, there is this conflict, and this conflict is not resolved on the boards. the outcome of this will depend on how much the united states is willing to put into the right factors to get iraq moving in the right direction. if they fail, it will be very unfortunate, but the people who will pay the price will be the people of iraq and american interests in the region. >> very quickly, the european perspective on the u.s.-iraq relationship. >> i think many people looking at that relationship feel that the u.s. wants to forget about iraq, start looking at it through the rearview mirror, look beyond. and people find that quite difficult to understand, aft
, who believe that the separation of religion from the state is the salvation of the country, that is the natural ally of the united states, not the islamic side. i think there should be more support for the politics of secularism in iraq. it would not be wrong. in fact, i would say and be necessary and highly desirable for the americans to support their natural allies, which i happen to believe represent the future of iraq and i myself am part of, at a personal level. so, there is this conflict, and this conflict is not resolved on the boards. the outcome of this will depend on how much the united states is willing to put into the right factors to get iraq moving in the right direction. if they fail, it will be very unfortunate, but the people who will pay the price will be the people of iraq and american interests in the region. >> very quickly, the european perspective on the u.s.-iraq relationship, emma. >> i think many people looking at that relationship feel that the u.s. wants to forget about iraq, start looking at it through the rearview mirror, look beyond. and peopl
that protects speech and religion but it protects association, it protects people coming together and making things happen in their community that wouldn't happen otherwise. americans give to these things like nobody else would every day. our religious institutions, our charities, our hospitals, our museums and others come together to take private resources and meet a number of community needs that are met in the best possible way by people who are doing that through a charitable effort. feeding the hungry, caring for the sick, serving the poor, educational institutions of all kinds undertaking critical research, money that goes to either help operate or actually support museums and parks. these are all the kinds of things that americans do because they give to charity. now, these things are so often done better than government bureaucracies would achieve this goal. cheaper, more effectively, more reasonably and -- and we need to do everything we can to continue to do that. in 2011, americans gave nearly $300 billion to charitable causes. 75% of that giving is done by individuals. of the 41
Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)